Kia Kappa Turbo 1.0-liter 120 hp Engine Revealed

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All-new Kia Kappa Turbo 1.0-liter (T-GDi – turbo gasoline direct injection) engine will make its world production debut at the 85th Salon International de l’Automobile in Geneva on 3 March 2015. Previewed by Kia in a special powertrain technology exhibition at Geneva in 2013, the new downsized engine is now fitted in a production model for the first time – the new Kia cee’d GT Line.

Kia’s new T-GDI Kappa engine embraces the industry trend towards smaller capacity, higher efficiency units which consume less fuel and emit fewer emissions – while still delivering responsive performance.
 
World production debut – the new Kia cee’d GT Line
The first car to benefit from Kia’s new 1.0-litre T-GDI engine will be the new cee’d GT Line range. In this application, the new Kappa engine will develop 120 ps and 172 Nm torque, and has been engineered to deliver lower CO2 emissions than the 1.6-litre GDI engine found in other cee’d models, pending homologation closer to the GT Line’s launch later in the year.
 
After the cee’d GT Line, which goes on sale across Europe in Q4 2015, the new 1.0-litre T-GDI engine will be made available on a range of other Kia models in future.
 
Fulfilling a sustainable engine downsizing strategy
The new power unit is the first of Kia’s upcoming range of downsized engines to make its debut in Europe, and has been developed in-house by Kia’s powertrain development team at its Namyang, Korea R&D centre.

Engineers’ key aims throughout development were to provide immediate engine response, highly-efficient combustion and access to maximum torque from low engine speeds. These represent the cornerstones of Kia’s wider strategy to develop downsized engines for its global model line-up.
 
Throughout the T-GDI’s development, Kia’s R&D teams have aimed for a 10 to 15 per cent improvement in fuel efficiency compared to the brand’s current 1.6-litre GDI engine.

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More efficient combustion with high pressure fuel injection and improved air flow
The new downsized engine features a newly-developed laser-drilled injector, with six individual holes. Instead of consistently injecting the fuel-air mixture onto certain points within the combustion chamber, the laser-drilled holes, laid out in a pyramid shape, provide a more even spread of fuel and air throughout the cylinder. Backed by a high pressure pump, the new laser-drilled injectors are able to provide fuel injection pressure of up to 200 bar.
 
The adoption of a straight air intake port – instead of the gently curved port in Kia’s existing 1.6-litre GDI engine – further improves air flow to the combustion chamber for improved fuel efficiency. The straight air intake port ends in a sharper air intake throat, reducing air resistance at all stages of air intake to the engine, improving cylinder tumble flow for faster, more efficient combustion and suppressing engine knocking.
 
Single-scroll turbocharger with efficient electric scavenging motor
The T-GDI’s single-scroll turbocharger is paired with an electric waste-gate motor, which improves the turbocharger’s performance with a highly efficient air scavenging strategy. As well as scavenging clean air for the engine to re-use for combustion, it is able to open the waste-gate at the same time to improve waste air flow.
 
This innovative system allows for greater low-end torque, more immediate engine response from any throttle position, and improved fuel economy under higher engine loads. In the Kia cee’d GT Line, the engine’s maximum 172 Nm torque is available across a wide 1,500-4,100 rpm range, with maximum power arriving at 6,000 rpm.
 
Lower exhaust gas temperatures and split cooling
The engine is also fitted with an integrated exhaust manifold, which lowers the exhaust gas temperature slightly. As well as improving high speed, high load fuel economy, lower temperatures also result in cleaner emissions by allowing the catalytic converter to operate more effectively.
 
The engine’s temperature is closely regulated with the adoption of a new dual-thermostat split cooling system. This allows the engine block and cylinder heads to be cooled independent of one another, the main thermostat controlling the flow of engine coolant to cylinder heads above 88°C to reduce knocking, and an engine block thermostat shutting off coolant flow above 105°C to reduce mechanical friction and aid efficiency.

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  • Jimbo

    Just as I expected, max torque at 6,000RPM instead of 4,850, meaning poor motorway performance and efficiency. I have no problem with smaller engines at all. They are the best choice for customers that are looking for an urban car. But if your annual mileage includes a lot of motorway driving (mine does), then you will need a larger engine.

    Best example: Ford’s 3 Cylinder EcoBoost engine used in Fiesta and Focus. Arguably the best 3 cylinder engine on the market, if you only drive in the city. But it’s a completely underwhelming and inefficient engine, if you drive mostly on motorways, A-roads, etc.

    • Domagoj

      OMG, how stupid you are. Under “maximum power” they meant maximum HORSE power (HP), not torque (Nm) !
      Similar specs have old Ceed engines (maximum HP at 6200 rpm) BUT maximum torque (Nm) @ 4200 rpm.

      This new engine infact has excellent specs, it has maximum torque available across a wide 1,500-4,100 rpm range, which is excellent for both town and highway.

  • Mobis21

    As impressive as this engine specs read I have the following concerns:
    High pressure pump? How quiet is it? Compression at this higher rate can often produce unwanted noisy, buzzy sounds from the high pressure fuel pump. Currently, Hyundai/Kia engines mated with these high pressure pumps need improved noise suppression insulation.

    Fuel economy? Hyundai/Kia engines currently do not dominate competitors in overall fuel economy in their competitive segment. Why?

    • Domagoj

      as stated in article, fuel economy should be better with turbo engine vs older engines (gas)

      • Mobis21

        That says nothing to answer my question about leading in fuel efficiency in a segment. Neither Hyundai/Kia leads in any segment.

        • Domagoj

          Who said they are leading in fuel efficiency? Who spoke at all about leading in any segment? In fact, Kia leads J. D. Power’s list of top initial reliability for cars, of all non premium brands, trailing only Porsche in total ranking. And concerns you have aren’t any more expressed than on other cars with turbo engines

          • Mobis21

            You are missing the point. I am not looking for a fight or argument. It is just a fact that Hyundia/Kia has not taken a leadership role in fuel efficiency where as, Honda and Toyota have.

          • Domagoj

            Any arguments for that? What Toyota and Honda engines you are speaking of?

          • Mobis21

            Now you are purposely going off topic. I made a factual statement and now you have to deal with it.

          • Domagoj

            You’ve said Toyota and Honda have better fuel efficiency with their comparative engines (we are speaking obviously of turbo engines and Kia one you haven’t even tried) . Argument that or I am afraid you are not serious

          • Mobis21

            There is no point having any further discussions with someone who is as uninformed as you. To endlessly argue a moot point. Inform yourself and this would not even be a discussion.

          • Domagoj

            Please you inform me haha lol i am still waiting for argument for that trash speak

          • Mobis21

            You are funny or mad. LOL ( :-{)

          • Domagoj

            You are both + you are speaking bullshit

          • Mobis21

            Nice. You sound frustrated. Sucks to be you.

          • Domagoj

            You sound like uninformative fool. Im still waiting you to back up your arguments that Toyota and Honda have better fuel efficiency than Kia. Till then I consider you’re talking trash.

          • Mobis21

            lol. Sheesh. I feel sorry for you.

          • Domagoj

            Toyota Auris 91 and 93kw gasoline engines, fuel consumption rated by Toyota drivers on spritmonitor.de, average 7.96L/100km: http://www.spritmonitor.de/de/uebersicht/49-Toyota/985-Auris.html?fueltype=2&constyear_s=2008&power_s=90&power_e=93&gearing=1

            Kia Ceed 92 and 93kw gasoline engines (so comparable engines of literally same power as Toyota’s engines in survey above), fuel consumption rated by drivers average 7.38 (for year 2012+), 7.77 L/100 km for older models. http://www.spritmonitor.de/de/uebersicht/23-Kia/945-ceed.html?fueltype=2&constyear_s=2012&power_s=90&power_e=93&gearing=1

            http://www.spritmonitor.de/de/uebersicht/23-Kia/945-ceed.html?fueltype=2&constyear_s=2008&power_s=90&power_e=93&gearing=1

            Toyota better in fuel consumption? LOL

          • Mobis21

            The trouble with you is that you want an argument to prove your point by cherry picking a few models. There is enough data out there that proves Toyota and Honda have more fuel efficient engines that’s why they sell so many cars but people like you just want to find some argument to convince yourself otherwise. Next you’re going to claim that Kia and Hyundai engines are even better than Hondas and Toyotas. But why stop there. Why don’t you just claim they are World beaters when it comes to overall fuel efficiency. Now I really, really feel sorry for you. (:-[)

          • Domagoj

            Cherry picking a few models? Haha
            Prove that claim of “enough data”, where is it? It seems it exists only in your head lol Get a life kid

          • Mobis21

            “kid”. Funny. lol. Since it is you who are the one claiming that Honda and Toyota engines are not the most fuel efficient it is you who needs to disprove what I have already stated. Come on, don’t be such a chicken. Show everyone just how…cough…cough…smart you are.

  • Kialover

    There has been an improvement in terms of consumption in the latest KIA crdi engines and the new T GDI engines. And one must confess that also the “old” u series crdi and the 1.0 and 1,2 Kappa engines werent that high consumption engines. And they are very reliable compared with the new german and europe brand engines, especially in term of timing chain except for the 1.4 and 1.6 petrol engines built in old model ceeds from 2006 to 2012. With the new model ceeds there hasnt been any problems with these non turbo petrol engines as i heard. I am convinced that with the new T GDI engines KIA has surely solved the petrol engine problems finally. And who nows maybe the 1.0 T GDI engine is also good for motorways.Take a test drive at your KIA dealer when the time is right. And if not than surely the upcoming 1.2 T GDI will convince . And if still not confident than you can take one from the upgrated CRDI engines which should make you definitely happy.

    KIA forever.

    • Domagoj

      new turbo engine, from looking at the specs, will be excellent for both motorways and town. It has great torque at wide span of rpms. Surely, we’ll see how reliable it is, but judging from excellent reviews of similiar turbo engine from Ford which earned excellent ratings,even for durability, we have no reason to doubt in Kia’s engine, especially as it comes with 7 year warranty.

  • MIG Auto Transport

    Nice power output for the displacement. Looking forward to it!